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Pre-Health Sciences


Program Start: 5 September 2017 - In Session
Credit Granting Institution: U of S
Length: 1 year of 4+ years

Overview:

The Health Sciences offer many career choices: Dentistry, Optometry, Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, Speech Pathology and even Veterinary Medicine to name a few.  There are many different ways to obtain any of these career choices. Some require a full degree before you can apply, others require two years or 60 credit units worth of course work. 

To choose a career path in the health sciences, please see a College Advisor to assist you with correct course choice.

Requirements:

Often these careers require High School prerequisites in Math and Science, such as Pre-calculus 30, Biology 30 and Chemistry 30.  However, not all require these. Make an appointment with an Advisor to ensure that you meet all necessary requirements.

Notes:

You can complete a full first year (30 credit units) of most degrees leading to Health Sciences at Cumberland College.  To complete your degree you must move to the University of Saskatchewan or Regina or another university with the degree program you would like to complete.  You must apply to, and be accepted by, the University of Saskatchewan or University of Regina to start your degree at Cumberland College.

Please see a College Advisor for academic advising to choose the correct courses for you.

Your university year may include the following courses

The Nature of Life (BIOL 120.3)

An introduction to the underlying fundamental aspects of living systems: covering cell biology, genetics and the evolutionary processes which lead to complex, multi-cellular life forms.


Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Notes:

Chemistry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120.

The Diversity of Life (BIOL 121.3)

Our world has at least 15 million species, all of which have adapted to particular environments and lifestyles and use energy to grow and reproduce. We examine these processes in representative organisms from all the major groups, and discuss factors influencing changes in biodiversity over time and space.


Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Notes:

Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 121.

General Chemistry I Structure Bonding and Properties of Materials (CHEM 112.3)

Structure, bonding and properties of materials. Topics include atoms and molecules, bonding, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, states of matter, and properties of materials. The laboratory illustrates material covered in the lectures.


Prerequisites:

Chemistry 30 and (Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30).

Notes:

Mathematics C30 or Geometry-Trigonometry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for CHEM 111 or 114 may not take this course for credit.

Introduction to Organic Chemistry (CHEM 250.3)

An introduction to organic chemistry; students will learn to name organic compounds, predict some of the properties and reactivity of compounds based on molecular structure, and grasp the importance of these concepts and their application to all sciences and life in general. Almost all the reactions in living matter involve organic compounds, and it is impossible to understand the molecular processes of living systems without knowing organic chemistry. CHEM 250.3 is intended as a basis for other courses, and a beginning for understanding organic and bio-organic chemistry. The laboratory will introduce students to basic chemical laboratory skills frequently used in organic chemistry.


Prerequisites:

CHEM 112 or 114.

Notes:

The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 250. Students with credit for CHEM 251 may not take CHEM 250 for credit.

Literature and Composition Reading Narrative (ENG 113.3)

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


Notes:

Only 6 credit units of 100-level English may be taken for credit.

Literature and Composition Reading Culture (ENG 114.3)

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


Notes:

Only 6 credit units of 100-Level English may be taken for credit.

Introduction to Canadian Native Studies (INDG 107.3)

Aims to develop students' critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and provide the background necessary for advanced Native Studies courses. Through course lectures and seminar discussions this course presents an overview of Aboriginal societies across Saskatchewan and Canada by linking processes of the past with contemporary issues.


Notes:

Students with credit for NS 105 or NS 106 (formerly NS 110) may not take this course for credit.
 

Basic Nutrition (NUTR 120.3)

An introduction to nutrition and health. The concepts of recommended nutrient intakes and dietary guidelines are introduced. The major nutrients and their functions in the body are outlined. Nutrition issues facing the general public are presented.

Biological and Cognitive Bases of Psychology (PSY 120.3)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major biological and cognitive areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, memory, learning, language, and motivation and emotion.


Notes:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.

Social Clinical Cultural and Developmental Bases of Psychology (PSY 121.3)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major social, clinical, cultural and developmental areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of intelligence, development, personality, social and cultural psychology, psychological disorders, treatment, and health, stress, and coping.


Notes:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.