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U of S


Program Start: 1 September 2021 - In Session
Location: Melfort, Nipawin, Tisdale
Credit Granting Institution: U of S
Length: 1 - 2 years

Overview:

Cumberland College is pleased to offer 12 face-to-face courses from the University of Saskatchewan.  All of the courses are offered in Melfort and many have a video connection to the Nipawin and Tisdale locations.  Additional courses are offered through televised and online delivery at all three campus locations.  You can complete a full first year (30 credit units) at Cumberland College, in some cases you can complete your full degree with us. Most of the time in order to complete your degree you must move to the University of Saskatchewan. Please see a College Advisor for academic advising to choose the correct courses for you.

You can pursue your degree in the comfort of your home community with us.                                                                                                     

Below are some areas of study you can pursue: 

Cumberland College offers the pre-professional year of classes that lead into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from the University of Saskatchewan.  The pre-professional year is study at the post-secondary level consisting of 30 credit units of courses. A minimum weighted average of 60% in these courses is required for admission to Nursing.  Admission to Year 2 of Nursing is competitive, therefore, the average for admission to Year 2 is normally higher than 60%. You can apply now for your Pre- Professional year now at Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

The University of Saskatchewan offers a degree in Pharmacy and Nutrition . Students can complete the first year of the program through Cumberland College. Please see a College Advisor for academic advising to ensure that you are taking the correct courses. Apply online to the College of Arts and Science.

You can complete a three year Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology at Cumberland College by taking a mix of classes from University of Saskatchewan, University of Regina, Saskatchewan Polytechnic, and Athabasca University. Apply online to the College of Arts and Science.

The University of Saskatchewan offers a direct-entry four-year program in  Agriculture and Bioresources, leading to a number of different degree options. You can take your first year at Cumberland College. Apply online to the College of Agriculture and Bioresources.

At the University of Saskatchewan you can take a four-year Bachelor of Commerce (B.Comm.) degree. Edwards School of Business offers a robust Bachelor of Commerce program in addition to a variety of graduate level programs. As a new Bachelor of Commerce student, you will be exposed to a diverse range of courses taught by some of the world’s top researchers that allow you to gain critical and creative thinking skills demanded by employers around the world. You can complete a full first year (30 credit units) at Cumberland College.  Please see a College Advisor for academic advising to choose the correct courses for you.

The University of Saskatchewan now offers a Direct Entry, 4 year Bachelor of Education program.  Students attending Cumberland College may be admitted directly into the College of Education at the University of Saskatchewan.  You can choose the Elementary/Middle Years program to work in elementary schools or the Secondary education program to teach in high schools. You can complete a full first year (30 credit units) at Cumberland College.

You can complete one or two years of Arts & Science at Cumberland College by taking classes from the University of Saskatchewan and/or the University of Regina. In some cases, it is possible to complete your full degree off-campus (i.e. 3 year Sociology).  Please ensure you see a College Advisor for academic advising to choose the correct courses to complete your degree. 

Requirements:

For admission requirments please see Admissions and Programs - University of Saskatchewan (usask.ca)

Notes:

To become a student at Cumberland College you must first apply to the University of Saskatchewan. The College of Arts and Science application deadline is August 17, 2021. For other deadlines see: Requirements and deadlines - Admissions - University of Saskatchewan (usask.ca)

Application Process:

  • Apply online to the University of Saskatchewan in the chosen area of study.
  • Pay a one-time non-refundable $90 application fee.
  • Provide supporting documents, like official high school transcripts. Transcripts must be forwarded directly from the Ministry of Education or other educational institutions.
  • Complete the Cumberland College Application Form (green Register button at the top of this page) to indicate interest in the program and to receive program updates.

**Interested in taking U of R classes as well? Explore our U of R program for more information or apply directly to the University of Regina.

 

Your university year may include the following courses

The Nature of Life (BIOL 120.3)

An introduction to the underlying fundamental aspects of living systems: covering cell biology, genetics and the evolutionary processes which lead to complex, multi-cellular life forms.


Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 90 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Notes:

Chemistry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120.

The Diversity of Life (BIOL 121.3)

Our world has at least 15 million species, all of which have adapted to particular environments and lifestyles and use energy to grow and reproduce. We examine these processes in representative organisms from all the major groups, and discuss factors influencing changes in biodiversity over time and space.


Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 90 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Notes:

Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 121.

General Chemistry I Structure Bonding and Properties of Materials (CHEM 112.3)

Structure, bonding and properties of materials. Topics include atoms and molecules, bonding, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, states of matter, and properties of materials. The laboratory illustrates material covered in the lectures.


Prerequisites:

Chemistry 30 or CHEM 90 or CHEM 100; and (Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30).

Notes:

Mathematics C30 or Geometry-Trigonometry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for CHEM 111 or 114 may not take this course for credit.

 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry (CHEM 250.3)

An introduction to organic chemistry; students will learn to name organic compounds, predict some of the properties and reactivity of compounds based on molecular structure, and grasp the importance of these concepts and their application to all sciences and life in general. Almost all the reactions in living matter involve organic compounds, and it is impossible to understand the molecular processes of living systems without knowing organic chemistry. CHEM 250.3 is intended as a basis for other courses, and a beginning for understanding organic and bio-organic chemistry. The laboratory will introduce students to basic chemical laboratory skills frequently used in organic chemistry.


Prerequisites:

CHEM 112 or 114.

 

Notes:

The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 250. Students with credit for CHEM 251 may not take CHEM 250 for credit.

Literature and Composition Reading Narrative (ENG 113.3)

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


Notes:

Only 6 credit units of ENG 110, 111, 112, 113, and 114 may be taken for credit. ENG 120 may be used to fulfill 3 credit units of first-year English or Humanities requirements, and may also be taken as an elective in addition to 6 credit units of other first-year English classes. Students in the B.A. Honours program in English may include only 6 credit units of 100-level English courses in the 120 credit units required for their degree. Costs in addition to tuition may apply to this course.

Literature and Composition Reading Culture (ENG 114.3)

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition. Class themes will vary according to instructor choice. Students are encouraged to refer to the Department of English website for descriptions of specific sections.


Notes:

Only 6 credit units of ENG 110, 111, 112, 113, and 114 may be taken for credit. ENG 120 may be used to fulfill 3 credit units of first-year English or Humanities requirements, and may also be taken as an elective in addition to 6 credit units of other first-year English classes.

Introduction to Canadian Indigenous Studies (INDG 107.3)

This course aims to develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and provide the background necessary for advanced Indigenous Studies courses. Through course lectures and seminar discussions this course presents an overview of Aboriginal societies across Saskatchewan and Canada by linking processes of the past with contemporary issues.


Notes:

Students with credit for NS 105, NS 106 (formerly NS 110), or NS 107 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled NS 107 until 2015. All students in this course will participate in an experiential learning activity which will require 3-5 hours to complete.

Indigenous Ways of Knowing (INDG 210.3)

This course introduces students to the rich and complex natures, forms and diversities of Indigenous Knowledge in comparative and local contexts. The focus will be on the relevance of local/traditional/Indigenous knowledge to decolonization, environmental sustainability, and self-governance.


Prerequisites:

INDG 107.3 and 3 additional credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST

 

Notes:

Students with credit for NS 210 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled NS 210 until 2015.

Basic Nutrition (NUTR 120.3)

An introduction to nutrition and health. The concepts of recommended nutrient intakes and dietary guidelines are introduced. The major nutrients and their functions in the body are outlined. Nutrition issues facing the general public are presented.


Biological and Cognitive Bases of Psychology (PSY 120.3)

This course familiarizes students with scientific theories and research related to the major biological and cognitive areas of psychology. Particular emphases will be placed on the advances that have been made in the fields of neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, memory, learning, language, and motivation and emotion.


Notes:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.

Social Clinical Cultural and Developmental Bases of Psychology (PSY 121.3)

This course familiarizes students with scientific theories and research related to the major social, clinical, cultural and developmental areas of psychology. Particular emphases will be placed on the advances that have been made in the fields of intelligence, child/adolescent development, culture, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders and treatment, and health, stress, and coping.


Notes:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.

Statistical Methods in Behavioural Sciences (PSY 233.3)

This course explores the role of statistics in research including statistical concepts and models (e.g., correlation and analysis of variance). The laboratory component will consist of training in the use of statistical software.


Prerequisites:

PSY 120.3 or PSY 121.3

Notes:

Refer to Statistics Course Regulations in the Arts & Science section of the Catalogue if intending to use for Arts & Science credit.

Foundations in Sociology Society Structure Process (SOC 111.3)

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines theories and methods for studying changes to the nature and organization of society from pre-modern, to modern and post-modern. Students will be introduced to core sociological concepts used to understand social inequality, social order, social change, and globalization.


Notes:

Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course for credit. Costs in addition to tuition may apply to this course.

Foundations in Sociology Social Construction of Everyday Life (SOC 112.3)

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines how we come to understand and experience ourselves and the world around us and how we create culture. Students will be introduced to the study of culture, socialization, social interaction, identity formation and self-fashioning, the social construction of class, gender and race, age, deviance, and other social phenomena.


Notes:

Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course for credit. Costs in addition to tuition may apply to this course.



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