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Orange Shirt Day

Cumberland College, the Marguerite Riel Centre, MUCC, and the Kelsey Trail Health Region invite you to show your support and commitment that Every Chi...

Service Awards

In any workplace, it's the people who make the difference, and Cumberland College is no exception!  Tom Weegar, President of Cumberland Colle...

ABE Class Supports Good Food Box

Tisdale Adult Basic Education Students give back by volunteering at the Good Food Box Program.

College History

Content:

  1. Development of Community Colleges
  2. Development of Cumberland Community College
  3. Cumberland Community College: 1980 - 1987
  4. Cumberland Regional College - A New Name, A New Direction
  5. Cumberland Regional College: Highlights from the 1990's
  6. Cumberland Regional College: Highlights from 2000-2010
  7. Cumberland Regional College: Highlights from 2010 - present
  8. Board Member Listing

Development of Community Colleges

On July 1, 1972, the Department of Continuing Education was established as a need was seen to bring about a rational and coherent system of post-school learning in Saskatchewan. In August of the same year, an Advisory Committee submitted a report on Community Colleges (The Faris Report). Acting on recommendations of that Report, Gordon MacMurchy, Minister of Education, announced on September 22, 1972, that the first community college pilot projects would go into operation that fall.

The philosophy of community colleges was centered on the word "community". The focus was to serve not just individuals, but communities as a whole. MacMurchy in a press release addressed three main concepts. Community Colleges would:

In December, 1972, four community college developers were appointed to assist in the establishment of four project college development areas: Swift Current region, Humboldt region, Melville-Yorkton region and La Ronge region. The developer’s role was to analyze the district, assist communities to determine their adult educational needs, recommend citizens for community college boards, and assist the board in launching the community college. The developers used seven principles taken from the Faris Report to guide their work:

In May, 1973, the provincial cabinet appointed community college boards in each of the above regions. Following their incorporation, their immediate responsibilities were to hire a principal for the college and whatever administrative and clerical staff considered necessary. Community Colleges, Saskatchewan style, were born.

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Development of Cumberland Community College

The Early Years: 1975-1980

The success of the pilot community college projects encouraged the Department of Continuing Education to expand the project, with the result that the whole province embraced the college system.  Formation of this community college began in the summer of 1974. Mrs. Mickey MacLennan was hired to develop a northeast Saskatchewan community college. Shortly after, Vern Bachiu was hired as an assistant to Mrs. MacLennan. They began by organizing an advisory committee of Northeast residents.  From this Advisory Committee and other community contacts, a Board of Directors was selected.  The first Board of Directors of Cumberland (then known as Northeast) Community College was approved by Order in Council #34/75 on January 14, 1975. The Board of Directors held their first meeting the very next evening, January 15, 1975.

Board photo

In April, 1975, Mr. Elias Nesdoly was appointed principal. Mr. Art Karras was appointed Secretary-Treasurer of the community college the following month. By June of 1975 , there were 2 other staff members working out of the Nipawin office, a Program Coordinator, Susan Weber, and a Clerk-Stenographer, Colleen Meyer. A second Program Coordinator, Rilla Edwards was working out of the Melfort office. During the spring of 1975, the college held a public contest ("Here’s Your Chance to WIN $25.00!) to determine a Cumberland Community College logo. The awards for the prize-winning entries in the contest went to James Weseen of Star City and Bruce Dawson of Nipawin. James Weseen presented the idea of using the three C’s and Bruce Dawson’s sketch showed a person paddling a canoe. Mrs. Kay Dobrowski, a member of the College Board, recommended to the Board that these two ideas be incorporated into one logo. The College Board accepted this recommendation and the final result is shown on the cover of this booklet.  Bruce Dawson, in submitting his entry of the canoeist stated, "The waterways and woodlands are part of our heritage. In this region, Indians and European trappers and traders used canoes for travel for centuries. The canoe represents the College itself, providing opportunities in the rivers, the currents of life."  Adult learning requests and community participation expanded throughout 1975 as did the volume of courses provided throughout the region. The first courses to be held in the region were between February and June, 1975. One hundred eighty-three adult learners took part in 11 courses during these first 5 months of programming. The first shared, cost program sponsored by Canada Manpower was held in Melfort for "Visiting Homemakers" with 8 participants.

The first full slate of courses was offered in the fall of 1975. There were 3 main types of courses:

The social demand courses ranged from beadwork and bookkeeping to barbershop singing. The most popular course of 1975-76 was "Re-upholstery" with a total of 338 participants throughout the region signing up!! Other popular courses throughout the ‘70’s included "Hair Care and Styling", "Sewing with Jean Cloth", "Chinese Cooking", "Macrame", "Metrics", and "Old Time Dancing". Of course in the spirit of the ’70’s, the price was right with the going rate being 50 cents per hour for tuition! Senior citizens could attend for free. Participation rates at this time reached 6,032 adults enrolled in 443 courses.  Staff grew as the number of courses grew and by September of 1978 there were 14 full and part-time staff members. Because of the decentralized model of education that was followed, the coordination of courses in the early years was done with the help of local contact committees. By 1978, there were 51 Local Contact Committees (made up of 203 volunteers) throughout the Region with courses being held in 52 communities. Volunteerism was alive and well in Saskatchewan!  The College had its official opening of its main office in Nipawin in June of 1976. A branch of the College was located in Melfort. These offices were full-time year round operations. Two additional branch offices were located in Hudson Bay (September, 1976) and Tisdale (January, 1977) on a part-time basis.

Memories of facilities during the early years include:

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Cumberland Community College: 1980-1987

The College continued to operate during the years 1980-87 with the help of hundreds of volunteers. The roots of the College were firmly based within the community and courses were developed in response to their needs. Some of the popular courses during this time included microwave cooking, aerobics, computer literacy, horse training, First Aid, and dough art. Many technical courses ran for farmers including welding, farm greenhouse operation, carpentry and farm wiring.

Other programs of interest included a week-long fur trapping course, Steam Engineering programs and secretarial studies offered via the competency–based model through Wascana Institute. Career Counselling was expanded to a full-time counsellor for a period of nine months in 1985-86. During April and May, 1986, the College hired an Art Instructor in Residence for 8 weeks which ran in the form of workshops, evening courses and guest lectures with an enrollment of 223 individuals.

During these years, facilities continued to grow and expand with increasing staff requirements. In Nipawin, 210 Centre Street housed the College during the ‘80’s. Melfort’s facility moved from Burrows Ave to the Melfort Mall and then moved again to 706 Main Street. Beth Goertzen’s adult basic education classrooms in Carrot River moved from a house to the old hospital. The College administration office in Hudson Bay closed in April, 1985, although Adult Basic Education courses continued to operate.

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Cumberland Regional College: 1988 - 2000

A New Name, A New Direction

The year 1988 brought with it major changes within the provincial College system. The change from the "Community" College to the "Regional" College not only resulted in a name change but a mandate change. The new Regional Colleges Act was passed as well as the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology (Sask Polytech) Act. This resulted in a larger geographical boundary with an increase in population as the Colleges picked up the areas around the cities that formerly had been served by city community colleges. There was a clear mandate to increase the number of University and Sask Polytech credit courses and to focus on employment related training. Hobby and leisure courses were no longer within the mandate of the College system.  The change had clear impacts on programming; during the first year as a Regional College, there were fewer courses and fewer students, but there were proportionately more student hours. The number of communities in which learning activities were offered decreased and with this, the role of the contact committee system was reduced and would eventually cease to exist by the early 1990s.  The College work force also required modifications. While the community college operated largely on a part-time human resource base, this pattern began to be modified to a full time year-round pattern. The staff needed to have competencies in not only administrative and organizational skills but also in education and training.

The very positive steps that were taken because of the change in mandate has resulted in:

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Cumberland Regional College: Highlights of the 1990's

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Cumberland Regional College: Highlights from 2000 - 2010

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Cumberland Regional College: Highlights from 2010 - present

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Board Member Listing

1975-76
Gary Parchewsky (Chair)
Al Lamb
Cliff Kelsey
Msgr. Ulinski
Kay Dobrowski
Wilf Bousquet
Gwen Hornseth

1975-76; 1976-77
Al Lamb (Chair)
Cliff Kelsey
Msgr. Ulinski
Kay Dobrowski
Wilf Bousquet
Gwen Hornseth
Shirley Bender

1977-78
Cliff Kelsey (Chair)
Catherine Dobrowski
Wilf Bousquet
Gwen Hornseth
Shirley Bender
Sylvia Ross
Harold Schultz

1978-79
Wilf Bousquet (Chair)
Gwen Hornseth
Shirley Bender
Harvey Heavin
F.G. Lidster
Sylvia Ross
Ronald Smith

1979-80
Francis Lidster (Chair)
Harvey Heavin
Jean Griffin
Shirley Bender
Bob Donnan
Sylvia Ross
Ron Smith

1980-81
(no record)

1981-82
Bob Donnan (Chair)
Harvey Heavin
Ronald Smith
Jean Griffin
June Hayes
Rose Campeau
F.G. Lidster

1982-83
Bob Donnan (Chair?)
Harvey Heavin
Ron Smith
Jean Griffin
June Hayes
Rose Campeau
F.G. Lidster

1983-84
June Hayes (Chair?)
Margaret Anderson
Eunice Taylor
F.G. Lidster
Bob Donnan
Ron Smith
Ferne Warner

1984-85
June Hayes (Chair)
Margaret Anderson
Irene Brehmer
Bob Donnan
Eunice Taylor
Tom Taylor
Ferne Warner
F. G. Lidster
Ron Smith

1985-86
Margaret Anderson (Chair)
Ferne Warner
Gordon Cresswell
Irene Brehmer
Bob Donnan
June Hayes
Eunice Taylor
Tom Taylor

1986-87
Margaret Anderson (Chair)
Ferne Warner
Gordon Cresswell
Irene Brehmer
June Hayes
Eunice Taylor
Tom Taylor

1987-88
Ferne Warner (Chair)
Margaret Anderson
Gordon Cresswell
Irene Brehmer
June Hayes
Eunice Taylor
Tom Taylor

1988-89
Ferne Warner (Chair)
Margaret Anderson
Gordon Cresswell
Irene Brehmer
June Hayes
Eunice Taylor
Tom Taylor
Don Campbell

1989-90
Gordon Cresswell (Chair)
Ferne Warner
Margaret Anderson
Irene Brehmer
Eunice Taylor
Tom Taylor
Don Campbell

1990-91
Gordon Cresswell (Chair)
Ferne Warner
Margaret Anderson
Irene Brehmer
Eunice Taylor
Tom Taylor
Don Campbell

1991-92
Tom Taylor (Chair)
Gordon Cresswell
Ferne Warner
Margaret Anderson
Irene Brehmer
Eunice Taylor

1992-93
Ken Magnus (Chair to May 4, 1993)
Maurice Taylor (Chair Beginning May 25, 1993)

1993-94 to 1997-98
Maurice Taylor (Chair beginning May 25, 1993)
Dorothy Schulte
Margaret Fast
Terry Knutson
Emily Lundeen
Larry Lysitza
Cathy Wojciechowski

1998-99
Maurice Taylor (Chair)
Dorothy Schulte*
Margaret Fast*
Terry Knutson*
Emily Lundeen
Cathy Wojciechowski*
*Outgoing as of June 8, 1999

1999-2000
Maurice Taylor (Chair)
Don Scott
Emily Lundeen
Helene Johnson
Tim Verklan
Ralph Wegman

2000-2001
Maurice Taylor (Chair to January 2001)
Don Scott (Chair from January to May 2001)
Tim Verklan (Chair from May to June 2001)
Helene Johnson
Ralph Wegman
Emily Lundeen *to January 2001
Pat Brooks *January 2001 to June 2001
Julien LeStrat *January to June 2001

2001-2002
Tim Verklan (Chair)
Helene Johnson
Maurice Taylor
Ralph Wegman
Julien LeStrat
Verna Cachene
Herb Sanderson *May to August 2002

2002-2003
Tim Verklan (Chair)
Mary Ellen Davis
Margaret Crawford
Julien LeStrat
Maurice Taylor
Helene Johnson

2003-2004
Tim Verklan (Chair)
Helene Johnson
Maurice Taylor
Mary Ellen Davis
Margaret Crawford
Julien LeStrat

2004-2005
Tim Verklan (Chair)
Helene Johnson
Maurice Taylor
Mary Ellen Davis
Margaret Crawford
Julien LeStrat
Don Hovdebo

2005- 2006
Tim Verklan (Chair)
Helene Johnson
Maurice Taylor
Mary Ellen Davis
Margaret Crawford
Julien LeStrat
Don Hovdebo

2006-2007
Maurice Taylor (Chair)
Don Hovdebo
Armand Thibodeau
Rosalie Daisley
Mary Ellen Davis
Elton Head
Julien LeStrat

2007-2008
Maurice Taylor (Chair)
Don Hovdebo
Elton Head

2008-2009
Armand Thibodeau (Chair)
Rosalie Daisley
Cecil Gooliaff
Peter Waldbillig
Jim Thiessen
Elton Head
Robert Georget

2009-2010
Armand Thibodeau (Chair)
Cecil Gooliaff
Peter Waldbillig
Jim Thiessen
Robert Georget
Elton Head
Joe Taylor
Rosalie Daisley

2010-2011
Armand Thibodeau (Chair)
Cecil Gooliaff
Peter Waldbillig
Jim Thiessen
Rosalie Daisley
Joe Taylor

2011-2012
Armand Thibodeau (Chair)
Rosalie Daisley
Jim Thiessen
Cecil Gooliaff
Joe Taylor
Peter Waldbillig
James Burns

2012-2013
Armand Thibodeau (Chair)
Rosalie Daisley
Jim Thiessen
Cecil Gooliaff
Joe Taylor
Peter Waldbillig

2013-2014
Armand Thibodeau (Chair)
Rosalie Daisley/Amber Hoffus
Jim Thiessen
Cecil Gooliaff
Joe Taylor
Peter Waldbillig

2014-2015
Jim Thiessen (Chair)
Peter Waldbillig
Amber Hoffus
Joe Taylor
Cecil Gooliaff
Armand Thibodeau

 

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