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Psychology


Program Start: 1 September 2021
Application Deadline: 1 September 2021
Location: Melfort, Nipawin, Tisdale
Credit Granting Institution: U of S
Length: 1 year only

Overview:

Psychology is the study of behaviour and how it affects our lives. With the complexity of our modern world, psychologists fill an increasingly important role in dealing with human problems.

University of Saskatchewan psychology students can choose to pursue either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree.  U of S students will choose courses in each of two areas of study: the cultural, social and environmental influences on behaviour or; the cognitive, neuropsychological and biological influences on behaviour. University of Regina students have similar choice of classes, however, the degrees are structured differently at each institution.  Please see a College Advisor to determine which classes you should be taking.

Requirements:

For admission to the University of Saskatchewan - College of Arts and Science:

  • Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30
  • Grade 12 with a minimum average of 70% in the following five subjects:
    • One English
    • One math (Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30)
    • Three other approved subjects:
      • Maximum of two natural sciences
      • Maximum of two social sciences or humanities
      • Maximum of one fine or performing arts
  • English proficiency

For admission to the University of Regina - Faculty of Arts:

  • Grade 12 with a minimum average of 65% in the following five subjects:
    • English Language Arts A30 & B30*
    • One approved math or science
    • One approved 30-level language, social science, or fine arts
    • One additional approved 30-level course

Notes:

To become a student at Cumberland College you must first apply to the University of Saskatchewan or University of Regina. The general application deadline for both universities is August 15, 2020.

U of S Application Process:

  • Apply online to the College of Arts and Science.
  • Pay a one-time non-refundable $90 application fee.
  • Provide supporting documents, like official high school transcripts. Transcripts must be forwarded directly from the Ministry of Education or other educational institutions.
  • Complete the Cumberland College Application Form (green apply button at the top of this page) to indicate interest in the program and to receive program updates.

U of R Application Process:

  • Apply online to the Faculty of Arts.
  • Pay a one-time non-refundable $100 application fee.
  • Provide supporting documents, like official high school transcripts. Transcripts must be forwarded directly from the Ministry of Education or other educational institutions.
  • Complete the Cumberland College Application Form (green apply button at the top of this page) to indicate interest in the program and to receive program updates.

You can complete a full first year (30 credit units) of a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree in Psychology at Cumberland College.  To complete your degree you must move to the University of Saskatchewan or the University of Regina. Please see a College Advisor for academic advising to chose the correct courses for you.

Careers:

Students who major in Psychology at the undergraduate level will often seek employment in the helping professions or in the many occupations that require interaction with people, from professional child care worker to office manager. To become a Psychologist you need to complete a Masters Degree or a Doctorate of Philosophy in Psychology and then join the Canadian Psychological Association.

Your university year may include the following courses

The Nature of Life (BIOL 120.3)

An introduction to the underlying fundamental aspects of living systems: covering cell biology, genetics and the evolutionary processes which lead to complex, multi-cellular life forms.


Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 90 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Notes:

Chemistry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120.

The Diversity of Life (BIOL 121.3)

Our world has at least 15 million species, all of which have adapted to particular environments and lifestyles and use energy to grow and reproduce. We examine these processes in representative organisms from all the major groups, and discuss factors influencing changes in biodiversity over time and space.


Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 90 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Notes:

Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 121.

Literature and Composition Reading Narrative (ENG 113.3)

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


Notes:

Only 6 credit units of ENG 110, 111, 112, 113, and 114 may be taken for credit. ENG 120 may be used to fulfill 3 credit units of first-year English or Humanities requirements, and may also be taken as an elective in addition to 6 credit units of other first-year English classes. Students in the B.A. Honours program in English may include only 6 credit units of 100-level English courses in the 120 credit units required for their degree. Costs in addition to tuition may apply to this course.

Literature and Composition Reading Culture (ENG 114.3)

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition. Class themes will vary according to instructor choice. Students are encouraged to refer to the Department of English website for descriptions of specific sections.


Notes:

Only 6 credit units of ENG 110, 111, 112, 113, and 114 may be taken for credit. ENG 120 may be used to fulfill 3 credit units of first-year English or Humanities requirements, and may also be taken as an elective in addition to 6 credit units of other first-year English classes.

Biological and Cognitive Bases of Psychology (PSY 120.3)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major biological and cognitive areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, memory, learning, language, and motivation and emotion.


Notes:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.

Social Clinical Cultural and Developmental Bases of Psychology (PSY 121.3)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major social, clinical, cultural and developmental areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of intelligence, development, personality, social and cultural psychology, psychological disorders, treatment, and health, stress, and coping.


Notes:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.

Foundations in Sociology Society Structure Process (SOC 111.3)

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines theories and methods for studying changes to the nature and organization of society from pre-modern, to modern and post-modern. Students will be introduced to core sociological concepts used to understand social inequality, social order, social change, and globalization.  Formerly: Part of SOC 110.6.


Notes:

Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course for credit. Costs in addition to tuition may apply to this course.

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